Parkour Is Not A Sport

“Jumping and running across rooftops in the high-flying sport of parkour…”

“The sport of parkour, in which teenagers run and somersault across roofs…”

“The group of fit, athletic students are practitioners of the extreme sport of parkour…”

News stories with phrases like this crop up all the time. Reporters and journalists call parkour a sport because they just don’t know how else to classify it.

Parkour is not a sport.

“But Alan,” you may say, “It doesn’t matter if parkour is called a sport! That’s just nitpicking points of semantics!”

It does matter. Ideas have power. Words give form to ideas. The way an idea is framed and presented is a critical part of how it’s received by those who hear it. The way we reference parkour is no different. Terminology matters.

Take skateboarding and martial arts. Consider how differently the practitioners of each are regarded. Skateboarders are often seen as irresponsible, reckless rebels who need to grow up. Martial artists are respected, and not just because they can beat the tar out of anyone who doesn’t respect them. They are respected and admired because what they practice goes beyond a hobby, beyond a sport.

Parkour has a lot in common with both skateboarding and martial arts. Parkour is creative movement, like skateboarding; fast, efficient movements, like martial arts; (seemingly) crazy stunts like skateboarding; constant training like martial arts. To the inexperienced eye, it seems that parkour could be a sport, as it has so much in common with skateboarding. I disagree. The differences between the two outweigh the similarities. Let’s explore this topic further. Lanjutkan membaca “Parkour Is Not A Sport”

An Interview with Yamakasi Team in Jump Magazine

Q: Please introduce yourselves individually.

Laurent: My name is Laurent Piemontesi, I am 30 years old for few years again and I live in Milano, Italy. Here I teach Art du Déplacement in a school called Forma Arte, where there are others different disciplines. I’m trying to do the same as I did in France working around sport, education, art and culture.

Guylain: I am Guylain Boyeke, I’m 35 years old and from France.

Châu: I’m Châu Belle, one of the founders of the Yamakasi. I’m 34 years old, living in Paris and I’m an actor.

Williams: My name is Williams Belle, I’m 30 years old, I am half French and half Vietnamese. I’m living in Sarcelles, where I spent all my childhood and where I train Art du Deplacement. When I was a child, I had a communication problem: I had a stammer, so I expressed myself thanks to the movement. Today I am an actor and professional photographer. But after a broken ankle during training, I put my artistic career aside until my recovery. I am currently working on a comic book in which I share my ADD/Parkour experiences, called “SUPERNEM”.

Q: Obviously Parkour has become a massive international movement now, but please explain how it all started for you guys right back at the beginning?

Laurent: Everything ???started off like a childrens ???game. We were training ???together, between friends. ???A cool time. Everything??? was still there to be ???discovered.

Châu: At the beginning, it??? was like a childrens game??? for us. Young people who ???want to become stronger, but in a particular way by working very hard with good mental preparation.

Williams: I was looking for physical and mental freedom. I found it in ADD. I was a prisoner of my fears and life apprehensions. I found the answers in the movement and inner searching, which allowed me to be calm and confident in front of the obstacles I encountered in life. Lanjutkan membaca “An Interview with Yamakasi Team in Jump Magazine”